1. Perkins M. Randomized trial of introduction of allergenic foods in breast-fed infants. N Engl J Med. 2016 May 5;374(18):1733-1743. 2. Data on file. Before Brands, Inc. 2019. 3. Holl JL, et al. Introduction and maintenance of early adaptive training protein blends in support of infant nutritional goals: safety and acceptability. Poster presented at: EAACI Pediatric Allergy and Asthma Meeting; October 26-28, 2017; London, United Kingdom. *For most infants with severe eczema and/or egg allergy who are already eating solid foods, introducing foods containing ground peanuts between 4 and 10 months of age and continuing consumption may reduce the risk of developing peanut allergy by 5 years of age. FDA has determined, however, that the evidence supporting this claim is limited to one study. If your infant has severe eczema and/or egg allergy, check with your infant's healthcare provider before feeding foods containing ground peanuts. † High risk was defined as born to a family with one first-degree relative with food allergy/atopic dermatitis or two first-degree relatives with atopic disease.

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Protection is Possible with the Food Allergy Protection Plan

Totally opposite from decades of advice to avoid the foods responsible for food allergies, research now says early and regular dietary exposure to a food—specifically a food often associated with allergies, like peanut—may help reduce the risk of a child developing an allergy to that food.1

Based on landmark scientific studies (LEAP and EAT), and recommendations by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI), this revolutionary approach is designed to help protect children from developing a food allergy.*

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Health Care Provider Resources

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Only SpoonfulOne is Backed by Multiple Proprietary Studies

1-Year Feeding Study2

STUDY OBJECTIVE
To evaluate the effect of a multiprotein food blend on biomarkers of allergic sensitivity.

METHODS
450 infants and children (50/50 high vs typical risk) were fed a multiprotein blend of egg, milk, shrimp, salmon, almond, hazelnut, walnut, peanut, cashew, and wheat. Subjects were fed daily for one year and randomized to multiple proteins, dual proteins, a single protein, and control.

RESULTS
Multiprotein dietary exposure resulted in notable improvements in allergy biomarkers.

Over 8,000 Feedings, Zero Allergic Reactions

IM EATING Study3

STUDY OBJECTIVE
To assess tolerability of SpoonfulOne multiprotein Mix-In in an at-home setting. 

METHODS
705 healthy infants randomized to SpoonfulOne Mix-In or placebo, fed daily for 28 days.

RESULTS
SpoonfulOne was well tolerated in an at-home setting. Of the 8,803 ingestions of SpoonfulOne, not one infant experienced an allergic reaction.

allergic reactions
in over 8.000 feedings

precisely portioned
with 30mg of each food

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